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to talk about the political driver. how taxes have fallen comment the culture becomes more open to high ceo compensation. deregulation, but it is a real mistake to ignore the economic drivers. there are very powerful economic drivers that are obvious. globalization, a technology revolution. it is keira -- clear though-- those are key drivers because of the global phenomenon. american discourse tends to be american. would raise a income of inequality with one lot past and that eighties how does that rise in canada? france, germany, united kingdom? it is important to face that squarely. as a political phenomenon the challenge is the benign forces i am a google addict but they are drivers of social and political consequences. i like to look at it from a quote from peter orszag that the big drivers are economic forces particularly in the united states politics to mitigate these economic forces has exacerbated. so to create much more concentration will try to soften the blow. instead it is the excel arab. who are the super rich? what do they think about the rest of us? the way i will lead ch
in the tax on india. so the british found themselves pooled into the gulf during the 1800's. not to colonize it to maintain order. they did with the relatively small amount of military force. but you are right. up through the early 1870's was one of british hegemonic control over the persian golf. the aftermath of rope or two with the independence of india that the british brigade at -- began their retrenchment with the independence of india, the british lost the rationale for their military presence and their lost the money to pay for their presence there. >>host: did the americans step in because of the vacuum or because they were asked? >> the story of british control shepherding over the golf plays itself out over 20 years. in 1968 the british announced the impending withdrawal in three years the americans initially said in very it explicit terms will not replace the british. the january 1968 announcement came during the same month as the ted offensive and there was no interest anywhere on capitol hill for any additional military commitments in asia. the british began three years of turn
control of the house. the tax cut deal, fights over the budget, the debt ceiling, deficit reduction, egypt, libya, and how obama's made the decision and took the actions he to go up but to explain how this is done to set up the 2012 campaign. he had a theory he could make the 2012 race a choice between different approaches to government and everything he did he tried to temper temper -- to other at to a choice. we did not know how things would end up on 2012 but i looked at his governing and elected strategy and it culminated. this is the back story of what happened in the presidential campaign. >> host: david corn. showdown is his most recent book that the national press club >> host: professor, we are here to talk about your book indispensable. i want to say this is a delightful book to read. you deal with very familiar figures. you attack them from some new angles. let's died 10. you have a quote but is attributed to different people also charles de gaulle is most often accredited. what does it mean? >> appropriately it has a dual meaning that people call them sells indispensable and th
in the mid-states and taxed? [applause] >> technically marijuana has never been legalized anywhere in the world yet it's been decriminalized. i'm sort of torn on that issue because i have four children. i don't want them to experiment with the drug convict the same time they realized as an economist that he take the profit motive away from the cartel's come and they eventually will cease to exist. the initial pain would be unbelievable, but it's difficult to say what direction that would go in. but i do think it would in the short-term the pain would be unbearable and that's why politicians are afraid to address the issue. they keep pushing it off until the next election. >> as a law enforcement officer for 30 years, the cartels are a vicious criminal elements and regardless they'll seek to continue their criminal elements connected beyond the street in my view as a law enforcement officer as they break the law, they should go to jail or be punished appropriately, regardless of what the sensei k. so if we want an effect on the cartels, the mexican government and law enforcement in
. [laughter] on his tax return. and then there was another note that said informant agrees to report his income. [laughter] >> my name, my name is toni platte. taking the few pages out of your book and making that your lead article in retrospect maybe wasn't the best choice. [laughter] >> actually, that wasn't -- that's not what happened. >> oh. >> i had two with articles that came out about the same time focusing on ronald reagan being an fbi informant. or, i should say, informer. >> oh, i didn't know that. so thanks for clarifying that. so as somebody who taught at the school of criminology in berkeley in the volatile late '60s and early '70s and who did research and published about the fb, and i whose looked at fbi records for a book that aye done on another -- that i've done on another o academic, i would say that the work you did was thorough, was careful, and there's no question that i think you made an accurate investigation. and i think we have to treat seriously the information that you provided us with. i think or there are many problems with the left reflecting about our histo
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5

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